If you have strong prescription glasses and your eyes are outside the range of LASIK vision correction, RLE is an excellent option for restoring your vision. Refractive Lens Exchange (also called Clear Lens Exchange) refers to removing the natural lens of the eye, and replacing it with an artificial implant. This is similar to cataract surgery, without a cataract (cloudy lens). Fortunately, modern advanced technology implants can provide distance, intermediate, and near vision.

If you have been told that you were not a candidate for Laser Vision Correction, either your corneas were too thin, or that Laser Vision Correction would not correct your presbyopia, this may an option for you.

Reduce Your Dependence on Glasses with RLE (myopia, hyperopia, astigmatism, and presbyopia)

Refractive Lens Exchange (RLE) involves replacing your natural lens with a clear lens implant or IOL (Intraocular Lens). The power of this lens implant can be adjusted to compensate for the glasses prescription.

 

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Refractive Lens Exchange FAQ

Refractive Lens Exchange (RLE), as known as Clear Lens Exchange (CLE) replaces the natural lens of your eye with an intraocular lens in order to correct your glasses prescription. RLE is typically done for people with thick glasses, who may not be candiadtes for laser vision correction (glasses too thick, cornea too thin, or outside the age limits for LVC).

RLE is typically done on people with extreme farsightedness who are unable to have LASIK.

Glasses are generally a pain to have, between the fear of breaking them and the constant cleaning, they’re a hassle for anyone who has them. Refractive Lens Exchange gets rid of the need for glasses entirely, or greatly reduces your need for them. Glasses are also a constant cost; if they break you need to repair them, if you need new ones it will also cost at lot of money. Whereas with RLE, it’s a one time cost and then you’re done.

The risks for RLE are generally the same as the risks for cataract surgery. The risk is small, but real.

Compared to other vision correction procedures (like LASIK or PRK), Refractive Lens Exchange is more invasive, and therefore has more risks with the surgery. Some of the risks and complications that may occur with RLE are:

  • Retinal detachment, especially in extremely nearsighted people
  • Dislocated intraocular lens
  • Increased eye pressure
  • Infection
  • All of these complications do have treatments, which have better outcomes the sooner they are detected, so always be sure to follow through with post-op check ups and exams after having a procedure like RLE.

If you have been told you are not a candidate for Laser Vision Correction, but you wish to live your life free of glasses, then accepting this risk might be worth it for you.

Always consult with a doctor to see if a procedure is right for you and be sure to follow through with post-op check ups and exams after having a procedure like RLE.

RLE involves removing the natural lens of the eye and replacing it with an advanced technology Intraocular Lens. This intraocular lens implant power can be adjusted to any power (including nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism) to correct for one's thick eye glasses prescription. This video explains how refractive lens exchange works.

In Ontario, Refractive Lens Exchange in Ontario varies from $4,000 - $5,000 per eye. Compared to the cost of replacing thick glasses throughout one's lifetime, this is a much more economical option.

At LCC, the cost of RLE is $4,650 per eye. Your surgeon will use whichever implant is best for your eye, and any excimer laser vision correction touch up (if needed) is provided at no cost. All preoperative and post-operative visits, and eye drops are included. There is no tax, and there are no extra costs.

In Ontario the cost of refractive lens exchange (clear lens exchange) ranges from $4,000-$5,000 per eye.

RLE involves removing the human lens of the eye, and replacing it with an artificial implant. This implant can compensate for the glasses prescription. Sometimes, and excimer laser “touch-up” is required after RLE to fine tune the desired outcome.

No. The implant can be exchanged for another type of implant (bt ths rare). There is no way to “re-implant” one’s human lens.

Yes, but only in very rare situations.

Almost nothing, just rough shapes. Without a lens, it would be similar to having a glasses prescription of +20.

There are risks to cataract surgery. It is possible to have swelling in the cornea, high pressure, infection, swelling at the back of the eye. Fortunately the incidence of these risks is very low.

Cataract surgery is covered by OHIP. Refractive services to allow patients to be less dependant on glasses are not covered (more accurate testing, laser measurement, aberrometry, astigmatism correction, presbyopia correction) The cost of these non-insured services varies depending on what services are chosen.

Yes, you may notice some new floaters after Yag laser capsulotomy. These floaters usually become less noticeable after about 2 weeks.

There is no quick fix for floaters. There is a laser intended for treating floaters, but the results are not very good. As many floaters become less noticeable with time, they are best left alone.

There is a laser intended for treating floaters, but the results are not very good. As many floaters become less noticeable with time, they are best left alone.

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